Making the Most of Membership Month

August is Membership and New Club Development Month. We are celebrating strong membership growth of nearly 25,000 members over the 2014-15 year. The hard work and support of our members has produced incredible results over the past year, most significantly with the recent polio eradication milestone on the African continent, which marked one year without a case of polio caused by the wild poliovirus. With your important efforts as Regional Leaders, we can continue attracting new members, engaging current members, and changing the world. Here are a few ways you can help:

  • 11828671_10154136027344552_1519046550404063775_nRotary’s social media channels, The Rotarian magazine, and Rotary.org are showcasing Membership Month promotions and activities all month long. We encourage you to share these features with your club and district leaders.
  • Remember to visit My Rotary or the Rotary Shop to find publications and resources to help you attract new members and engage your current members. Copies of many of these publications are also available through your Rotary workgroups.
  • Tell our colleagues in Membership Development why you joined Rotary—and why you continue to stay involved—on Facebook or at membership.minute@rotary.org. Sharing the positive experiences you have had as a Rotarian is an effective way to interest a potential new member!
  • Finally, take a moment to read a blog post by Zone 24 West E/MGA Chris Offer about why he stayed in Rotary.

What strategies for attraction and engagement are you using during Membership Month? Share them with us in the comments below!

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Being a change agent – Part 2

This is Part Two of a two-part post. You can view the first part here.

Written by Colette Martin-Wilde and Megan Anderson, Strategy Development & Change Partners, Rotary International, with examples from Zone 26 RRFC Pam Russell

4. Resources: Give people a clearly defined point of contact for questions, requests for information, tools, or materials.

Pam Russell: Each district approaches this in different ways.  In some districts, leadership builds a team and assigns each person to a small set of clubs.  These individuals receive additional training or already have some skills specific to  Foundation grants.  They work with clubs to develop grants, and bring clubs together to support larger grants.  In some districts, these tasks are assigned to the assistant governor, but depending on the volume of activity, it may be more effective to identify an individual dedicated to grants.

  1. Action plan: The action plan details what will be done to provide needed skills, what incentives and messages will be used, what resources will be available, as well as who will provide support and information in order to realize the vision, i.e., successfully implemented change.

Pam Russell: The transition to the new funding model required careful planning and execution.  The success we had in Zone 26 can be measured by the rapid increase in global grants being implemented in the second year after the launch.  Each district took time to implement a full action plan, but the new model’s success is seen in the impact Rotarians are having with their service projects throughout the world.  Each successful grant tells a story.  Clubs and districts should use these stories and pictures as tools to strengthen clubs and share Rotary’s good work around the world.

Research shows the following, predictable consequences when any of the components outlined above are missing:

  • Confusion
  • Anxiety
  • Gradual change
  • Frustration
  • False starts

change flowchart

The next time you see a change coming and are championing that change, remember this framework. Ensure that all of these pieces are a part of your plan and you will be on your way to being an effective change agent. You may just find that it does not really feel like change at all, but the most obvious path forward to a brighter future.